How Companies Turn Your Facebook Activity Into a Credit Score

This story in The Nation explains our work challenging the way data brokers use "black box," or secret, algorithms to make scoring decisions that may violate the law and deny credit opportunities. This work was also the subject of our recent livestream event featuring Professor Frank Pasquale and his new book, "The Black Box Society." We've now posted an archive of that event, in 3 chapters on our Youtube page.

Media Hit | Democracy

We don’t need more money in politics

Outside the Capitol, citizens of every political stripe believe money is playing far too great a role in elections, is having a poisonous effect on governing and needs to be reined in.  But a bill already passed by the state Assembly and headed to the state Senate this fall takes the position that there is not enough big money in politics and even larger campaign contributions are needed.

Media Hit | Health Care

Using 'Pay for Delay,' Big Pharma Pockets $98 Billion

What if I told you that major pharmaceutical companies had paid off their competition to delay the release of lower-cost generic drugs for 20 major pharmaceuticals? And that combined, brand name drug companies made an estimated $98 billion in total sales of these 20 drugs while the generic versions were delayed? Unfortunately, it’s true, and it means that too many sick Wisconsinites either can’t afford the prescription medication they need, or are paying 10 times too much.

Media Hit | Transportation

State needs to build better transportation budget

The state needs a better transportation budget.  . . . .  One promising idea is a proposal from 1000 Friends of Wisconsin, WISPIRG and the state chapter of the Sierra Club to cut 10% from highway spending. The money would be used "to reduce bonding by $200 million, increase local road reimbursements by $82 million, and increase transit funding $21 million (a 10% increase in local road reimbursement and transit funding)," according to a news release the group issued last week.

Scott Walker's rent-to-own budget provision brings strong reaction

Rent-to-own stores would be able to sell customers high-cost financing plans for televisions, appliances and other goods without disclosing their interest rates, under a provision in Gov. Scott Walker's proposed state budget. In addition to exempting the industry from state consumer protection laws, the measure would cap how much wronged customers could get if they sued rent-to-own stores. The stores typically sell products under plans that cost buyers two or three times prices they would pay elsewhere, according to a report by the Wisconsin Public Interest Research Group.


Subscribe to More Media

Join Our Call

Tell your representative to stand up for our democracy, and amplify the voices of small donors in our elections.

Support us

Your donation supports WISPIRG's work to stand up for consumers on the issues that matter, especially when powerful interests are blocking progress.

Consumer Alerts

Join our network and stay up to date on our campaigns, get important consumer updates and take action on critical issues.
Optional Member Code